5 Gaming Clichés We Hope Won’t Carry Over to Next-Gen Consoles

What we hope is not on Next-gen consoles

Gaming has definitely progressed over the years. From the original Nintendo to upcoming next-generation consoles it’s an amazing to think about how far gaming has come. Because gaming has progressed so much over the years there have been so many changes to the standards of each game. If there was a new release about a little white ball bouncing across the screen or an ape throwing barrels down at a plumber then people probably would no longer be excited to get the game. Now that gaming has progressed into much more than just a measly little game, gamers are always expecting bigger and better than they had before.

Because players expect more from each video game release, things have gotten tough on developers to make something better than what they have created before. Even with the challenge of bigger and better games there should be a standard that each modern to next-gen video game release should accomplish. With how far gaming has come there are a few video game clichés of the past that players find annoying and no longer want to see in upcoming titles.

Pausing Video Games

Not Letting Player Pause Cut Scenes:

Now that gaming has made it as far as to have interesting cut scenes; in most games it would be nice to be able to pause them in case of an interruption. Cut scenes are the fundamentals of good story telling in gaming so when a player is interrupted by the phone, door bell or other everyday disturbances it would be nice to know that you can pause the game without skipping over anything important or letting it run while something is going on in real life. Unfortunately, pausing cut scenes are common but not always done in modern gaming so with prayers we hope that nothing like this makes its way onto next-gen consoles. Even with being more common to include an option to pause than not, this should be considered one of the very least principles to include in any game from the start. No one wants to miss any important information regarding the game or ignore everyday needs, so from now on and into the next-gen era all games should include this very basic feature.

Dead Rising does it right, the players in control!

Dead Rising does it right, the players in control!

When and Where the Game can be Saved:

Saving progress on video games used to be something that wasn’t even possible. As gaming advanced games were made more in-depth which made saving and absolute must before any game could ever be fully completed. Since then and continuing on, gaming has made it even farther with even more reasons to need to save the game more often. No player wants to lose all progress for any reason, so making it easy and convenient (if not letting the player choose when to save) is of vital importance. No next-gen game should force players to ever restart and entire level of a game if for some reason they need to stop in the middle. Although this is not a real problem even in modern gaming it is too important and should be considered one of gaming’s basic ethics. As of today’s gaming society, every title pretty much meets this requirement; if they don’t we would bet the game wouldn’t get much respect from the gaming community.

No more ammo

Loosing Ammo and Equipment After Dying and Being Replaced at a Checkpoint:

There are few games out there that still punish players greatly for making a mistake and dying after passing a checkpoint. When someone passes a checkpoint with 500 bullets and dies shortly after they should appear at that same spot with that same 500 bullets. In the past some games out there would deduct the bullets used during the second try which would make the checkpoint even harder to pass a third time. Games that have done this not only annoy the heck out of the player but they also sort of make themselves more impossible to beat. Doing so will not only force the player into an angry mood but it will also most likely make less of an audience fall in love with the game without even knowing why, even if the rest of it is really fun. It is hardly ever seen in modern gaming now and may be a standard that is already passed but something no player wants to see on any next gen console.

Hitman: Blood Money has a thing for twins.

Hitman: Blood Money has a thing for twins.

Similar or Repetitive Enemies:

A few years ago we are sure most of our viewers remember getting stuck at a certain part in a game, memorizing the pattern enemies walk in and coming back to beat it perfectly. This is something that is still seen in some games and something that is not in others. While most people in real life do not walk in the same pattern every day, look exactly like their neighbor or say the same sayings over again we can see this changing as we progress into the next generation of consoles. Although this cannot be considered a ‘standard’ it is annoying to see a game use tactics like these to where the pattern is easily spotted or very short to where nothing is left to wonder about whom ever is walking the line. The perfect example of this change and how it is slowly being fixed is through Hitman: Blood Money and Hitman: Absolution. The games had been released years apart and are of the same series so the example of how AI’s used to ‘walk’ and how they are currently moving can be perfectly seen when playing just one mission of each of these games. Enemies and sideline AI’s are getting more unique, more realistic and tougher for a gamer to decode so the “having the enemy do the same exact thing every time” technique will soon be long gone.

Call of Battlefield

Lack in Creativity:

The largest annoyance in modern gaming and something players hope won’t continue onto next-gen consoles is the absolute lack in creativity. One of the major downfalls of the industry progressing so far is the fact that when one game is doing well ten other jump on that band wagon and try to do the same exact thing. Games like Call of Duty, Medal of Honor, Battlefield and a lot of smaller titles are all so similar (even though people do have their preferences). It was like a trend that started and every company had to taste even a little piece of the raise in military first person shooter success. The same system can go for zombies or futuristic robots/ aliens. There are a lot of games that are out there or upcoming titles that are so much of the same thing that we have all seen before. What gamers need is a variety of games to choose from with a variety of different things to do in the game. Games that are different than the others out there are the ones that capture great attention and that’s what we need more of.

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3 Comments on "5 Gaming Clichés We Hope Won’t Carry Over to Next-Gen Consoles"

  1. xino December 28, 2012 at 8:57 pm - Reply

    i agree with some notes here

    the pausing Cutscene is a must, some games do allow pauses during cutscenes but nearly every game should allow this next gen.

    i’m not bothered about save games, checkpoints are there and there are lots of em.

    Not worried about losing ammo during check point, never saw a problem with this.

    I’m not worried about repetitive enemies, as long as they make the game challenging or act dynamic reaction and animation.

    I agree with the lack of innovation, problem is publishers are not taking risks, they are already taking risks by releasing sequel AAA games:/

    games like Never Dead, Fuse sound interesting but they lack innovation! Especially Fuse which I find so bloody generic! I feel so sorry for Insomniac because the game will not sell well.
    Never Dead had 1 good unique feature but still lacks innovation.
    Innovative games are being made on bloody Indie games>:/

    Hoping devs can take advantage of Wii U game pad screen and come up with innovative gameplay integration and features.

  2. Trex December 28, 2012 at 9:25 pm - Reply

    “When and Where the Game can be Saved:”

    Hope that is fixed for the next gen because the current gen is affecting PC gaming too much for comfort. I welcome console ports but they bring the annoying save point system into a platform (PC) that traditionally allow you to save anywhere, anytime you want. Checkpoints/autosaves around critical areas or events are fine but it would be nice to be able to manually save somewhere in between especially in huge open world RPGs. Also saves tend to get corrupted even in this modern age of gaming so having multiple save files is preferable (or when you accidentally autosaved while jumping around avoiding a tough monster).

    In Max Payne 1 and 2 you could save at anywhere and play around with the Bullet time at any specific area you’ve saved. MP employed an interesting quicksave system that lets you save in multiple slots so you could revert back to a better one should you saved just as running into an enemy. In Max Payne 3, you need to battle through a number of other areas to get the one that you like.

  3. poppy December 28, 2012 at 11:12 pm - Reply

    *Losing Ammo and Equipment After Dying and Being Replaced at a Checkpoint: Not “Loosing”.

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